Sunday, August 16, 2009

Sunday Mille-feuille Tonkatsu Trial

It's been a while since I deep fried anything. The large amount of oil needed, the heat it produces in the kitchen (not to mention the lovely fry scent throughout the house).. So long story short I burnt the panko crust a little.. The oil was too high.



At this moment I'm guessing the center is still a bit pink but I always let the carryover heat do the last 20% or so of the cooking for a nice moist cutlet. This piece didn't take long to cook because the pork loin used was the wafer shabu-shabu cut. The method commonly known in Japan as the Mille-feuille Tonkatsu.



As one would guess extremely tender. The center was nice and moist but because of the too high heat, the edges were too well done for my liking.



I haven't found a butcher that would cut the pork with a deli slicer for me yet and I'm paying a small premium for the Shabu Shabu cuts at Asian markets. Sometimes up to two dollars more per pound. If I had my own deli slicer though... Hmm.. :)

I give my Tonkatsu a C+ today. And next time I'll actually follow through with making my own nama-panko. The few slices of shokupan I had left out wasn't stale enough to grate this morning.



I think I was more proud of my slicing of the paper thin shredded cabbage. I strive for the mound to be as fluffy as cotton candy.



I felt like using the sweeter Ikari Chunou Sauce and with a fresh citrus squeeze of lime from the tree in my backyard, it still turned out to be a pretty tasty meal. Yum! :)

11 comments:

K and S said...

ooh, I think there is a katsu place called "kimukatsu" that does this type. I like your shredded cabbage, mine never comes that thin! I am too scared to deep fry, so I'll just drool over this :)

Dennis K. said...

Hi K&S! I swear by the Usuba nakiri bocho.. Mine was super cheap that I picked up at a local market and the "hamon" line was even a fake silk screen print! ha. It was razor sharp but does rust very easily if left out without cleaning. But boy, deep frying is a lot of effort for just one meal.....

caninecologne said...

omfg - i love fried food! but i hate frying it!!!! i'm a wimp in the kitchen because i fear getting burnt and splashed by the hot oil! the last time i fried anything was during the fires in 2003. yes, that long ago. i made pecan crusted chicken tenders. once. ha ha.

K and S said...

I should look around for a better knife...I only have one! I really want to make malasadas but the heat here is just too unbearable!

cabcooks said...

Looks so good! Excellent job on the cabbage! I have a small modest set of knives that I've collected over the years but my favorite is the Misono. But what's even better is my knife sharpening set! That can make any run of the mill knife wonderful.

Mmmmm, love fried foods! I've gotten better at it this past year and probably fry 1-2x per month. Mostly Thai fried wings lately. Your tonkatsu has me thinking I should make som chicken katsu soon.

KirkK said...

Hey Dennis - Have you ever made your own Katsu Sauce? It's pretty easy, and since you have some very distinct flavors you're looking for, you might enjoy making it.

Dennis K. said...

Hi CC, Ha, you're too funny! My other problem is that frying is far and few in between and I don't know what to do with the leftover oil. For now it's strained and in a covered pot..

Hi K&S, ah man I think I have at least five knives. Not that I really ever use them to its fullest potential, haha. But hey, if it lets me enjoy cooking more right? :)

Hi CAB, I recently wanted a Misono cause I liked the narrow sharp looking ends on one of the styles. Do you sharpen them yourself? I know the angles are different between western and asian cutlery..

Hi Kirk, I never tried but sounds fun! I know I never been a big fan of the ketchup blended, I think called Island style? But I've been meaning to start my own batch of yakitori tare for a while now. Would like to let it set over time under my sink and make the flavors mellow out.. My friends are scared of the concept but supposedly the sugar and sodium should help it keep semi-indefinitely.. or so I read.

Steven said...

Can i ask you how you get the paper thin cabbage? Methods and tools probably? I appreciate.

Dennis K. said...

Hi Steven! No big secret really. Just some practice but I do tend to rely on my Usuba.
You can get them at Japanese supermarkets for not too much (under $15). Those usually are carbon steel blades which makes it nice and sharp but rusts really easily, so you need to wipe it completely dry after usage and rinsing. Hope this helps and good luck!

Rina said...

We have a place next to Mitsuwa Torrance called Kagura. I heard their Mille-feuille is awesome. Wish you posted a recipe because I want to try!

Dennis K. said...

Hi Rina, I haven't tried Kagura yet, thanks for the rec! I'm actually surprised how places don't exploit the method more. In theory it shouldn't raise the ingredients cost any because the difference is only in prep method.
As for a recipe, not much different than regular tonkatsu except that I used shabu shabu cuts. It was tricky to stack them up tho, the pieces are so delicate, haha. Next time I'm going to ask a butcher if they'll slice pork the way for me.