Tuesday, January 10, 2012

Garlic Ginger Pork With Easy Shoyu Red Wine Sauce

The meal was easy enough that the subject line almost gives away the recipe. A twist on the standard Ginger Pork (Shogayaki) dish that I came across again on a random Japanese television show. The program was again short and so the instructions on the vague side (a tactic I now see often so to publish and promote a proper cookbook at a later date), but I managed to turn out something pretty tasty despite the day with my ad hoc interpretations.



This particular Shogayaki, the pork slices themselves are seasoned simply and instead is drizzled later with a flavorful sauce. The thinner ~1/8" pork loin slices I happened to pick up at Marukai. I often purchase meats at Japanese Markets only because they conveniently prepare it the way I prefer. Wished nearby Sprouts (formerly Henry's) would regularly shelf Shabu-Shabu style or even pork belly blocks for Kakuni. Would definitely make my life easier.



But anyway, I used extra virgin olive oil, light S&P, and a good amount of finely minced garlic for the initial saute. I happen to only have the large milder Elephant Garlic, so was pretty generous with. Grated a nub of ginger but only used its shibori jiru squeezed liquids and not the pulp. These thinner cuts take no time at all to get done.



Plate them and remove excess oils in the fry pan (leaving a Tbspn or so). Pour a 1:1 drazzle amount of Red Wine and Soy Sauce into the pan. What's a "Drazzle"? For me, it's more than a drizzle, maybe twice so. Add a good pad of Butter, then drizzle a bit of Mirin. Cook off alcohol on medium heat and reduce some (couple of minutes) to a light glaze. Pour over pork.



The Japanese/Asian Potato Salad was also winged but something I came up on my own. Razor thin cuts of white onions (rested in ice water) and crunchy Japanese Kyuri cucumbers. (I skip the Apples that are sometimes included, don't care for them.) Hard boiled egg and only a little Kewpie Mayo, but added some rich goat cheese to compensate. Dang, this Was Good. The batch I have left I may add even more goat cheese and maybe razor thin slices of pear fruit for the next round. Coarse ground black pepper is always my friend, as is the mound of fine shredded cabbage to balance things out as a Teishoku meal. Plate of warm Japonica sticky white rice not shown. マイウー。

8 comments:

Mike said...

Looks lovely! Ginger pork is such a nice dish. Sherry got a verbal recipe from a Japanese coworker a year or so ago, and it has been in our regular rotation ever since.

K and S said...

looks and sounds yummy!

Dennis K. said...

Thanks Mike! I sort of skipped the standard version since many recipes can be already found online. Where do you get the thinner cuts of pork? Or do you use thicker?

Hi Kat! It's pretty tasty. I over sauced the plate a little but only means I get to eat more rice with, haha.

caninecologne said...

hi dennis - i like your recipe posts! now if only i wasn't so lazy....

Dennis K. said...

Hi CC! Miss organized itinerary person lazy!? ;) Don't want to sound like Rachel R. but I actually did this during my lunch break in 30 including the photo taking and eating (except the potato salad I made the night before). I had to eat really really fast though, haha.

CAB said...

Hi Dennis! Wow, that plate looks delicious.

Dennis K. said...

Hi Carol! The pork wasn't the most tender cut, so I might have tenderized with a fork first. I think the sauce would be great on sauteed mushrooms.

Mike said...

Dennis - on your question of where we get the pork, we usually use the thinly cut pork slices from Nijiya.